Import Postman requests, collections and environments to Testfully

Import Postman requests, collections and environments to Testfully

We’re pleased to announce the release of a new feature that enables importing your data from Postman to Testfully. Using the new importer (available via Settings > Import), you can import your Postman requests, collections, and environments. We have tested it using the latest version of Postman and highly recommend upgrading to the latest version of Postman before exporting your data.

Upgrade to the latest version of Postman before exporting your data. First, import your Postman environments (if you have any), and then import your Postman collections.

If you’re a Postman user and looking for a Postman alternative, we have compared the top 5 Postman alternatives which we highly recommend to read.


Table of Contents


Export Postman collections

To export a Postman collection, please follow the below steps.

  1. Open Postman
  2. Click on the Collections tab on the left navbar of Postman
  3. Hover your mouse over the collection you want to export
  4. Click on the “…” icon
  5. Select the Export option
  6. Select the “Collection v2.1 (recommended)”
  7. Click on the Export button
  8. Save the collection file


Export Postman environments

To export a Postman environment, please follow the below steps.

  1. Open Postman
  2. Click on the environments tab on the left navbar of Postman
  3. Click on the environment you want to export
  4. Click on the “…” icon
  5. Select the Export option
  6. Save the environment file


Import Postman environment to Testfully

Using Postman Environment Importer (available via Settings > Import > Postman Environment), you can easily import your Postman environments to Testfully. Postman environments map to Testfully environments and Environment Variables in Postman map to configs in Testfully.

We highly recommend importing all of your environments to Testfully before importing your requests & collections.


When processing an exported environment file from Postman(.json), Testfully handles the data as below:

  • Testfully tries to add a new environment to your workspace with the same name as your Postman environment. If your workspace already has an environment with the same name, Testfully uses that environment instead of creating a new one.

  • Testfully tries to add new config values per environment variable in the provided JSON file. If your workspace has a global with the same name, Testfully won’t add a new config.

  • Testfully updates matching config values of the matching environment using the values provided in the JSON file.

If you’re considering Testfully as a tool for API testing and monitoring and have used Postman in the past, we highly recommend reading the Postman alternative article which compares Postman and Testfully.


Importing Postman collections (V2.1) to Testfully

Using the Postman Collection Importer (available via Settings > Import > Postman Collection), you can easily import your Postman collections and included requests to Testfully. Postman requests map to Testfully tests and collections in Postman map to folders/collections in Testfully.

Import your environments before importing collections to get the most out of the Postman importer tool.


When processing an exported collection file from Postman (.json), Testfully processes the data as below:

  • Testfully tries to add a new collection and a new folder to your workspace with the same name as your Postman collection. Testfully skips this step when your workspace already has a folder or a collection with the same name.

  • Testfully tries to add requests as a test to your workspace. If your workspace already has a test with the same title, Testfully skips importing the matching test and proceeds with the rest.

  • Testfully supports most HTTP methods that Postman supports, but if you’re using one of the unsupported methods, Testfully skips importing that test and proceeds with the rest of the dataset.

  • Your Postman requests might be using environment variables. Testfully tries to use globals for them as well, as long as you have a global in your workspace with the same name as the environment variable in your tests.


Import Postman collections

To import a Postman collection, please follow the below steps.

  1. Open Postman
  2. Click on the Collections tab on the left navbar of Postman
  3. Click on the Import button
  4. Click on the Upload Files button
  5. Click on the Import button


Import Postman environments

To import a Postman environment, please follow the below steps.

  1. Open Postman
  2. Click on the Environments tab on the left navbar of Postman
  3. Click on the Import button
  4. Click on the Upload Files button
  5. Click on the Import button
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